Remembering Baby: Life, Loss and Post-Mortem

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Remembering Baby: Life, Loss and Post-Mortem is a small but powerful exhibition that can be seen in London for the next couple of weeks. It explores the space of pregnancy loss where parents and professionals meet. Organised as a part of ‘End of’ or ‘Start of’ Life Project carried out at the University of Sheffield, it shows ways of articulating loss of a baby in ways where words may not be the only source of meaning. Objects invoking memories are accompanied by sound pieces inspired by memories and experiences of parents who have lost a baby at an early stage of life.

Find out more at rememberingbaby.co.uk; twitter @_rememberbaby

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Venues:

3-14 November 2017, Protein Studios, 31 New Inn Yard, Shoreditch, London, EC2A 3EY

5-14 December 2017, The Art House, 8 Blackfields, Sheffield, S1 4HJ

Sue Butterworth, Empty Photo Project

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“Emptiness is so much sadness and so much pain. Emptiness is feeling like you failed as a mom because you couldn’t protect your first child.” Sue Butterworth, Empty Photo Project

There are a number of art projects where emotions related to pregnancy and baby loss are expressed not just with words but also through visual means. Empty Photo Project was created by Sue Butterworth following her pregnancy loss in March of 2017. The photographer decided to tackle the loneliness of her grief by capturing experiences of those who have also experienced a pregnancy loss. The project description on the website reads:

‘Every portrait is taken in a location that has significant meaning to each story. The individual in the image holds a mirror, thereafter manipulated in Photoshop, to represent the emptiness and grief they feel after losing one or more children. The participants are then asked to describe in 200-400 words what their “empty” looks like and what it means personally.’

Sue also runs an Instagram account: @emptyphotoproject

Website: https://emptyphotoproject.com/

Michelle
“Never has my heart truly felt the pain that the word empty can hold until now, my arms are empty as is my heart.” Sue Butterworth, Empty Photo Project